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Ubuntu to enforce short-sighted decision on net book users

http://www.scripting.com/stories/2010/02/14/googleDidSomethingSeriousl.html

twitter+facebook+google are all US. companies and governments are increasingly relying on those companies, and users are relying more and more on those media for basic communication. What do you think will happen if the US declares war on your country? Will you even be able to react?

Data souvereignity

http://www.stuff.co.nz/3331115/Facebook-users-easy-prey

http://www.gamesbrief.com/2010/02/how-dont-be-evil-leads-to-guantanamo-bay/

http://whentwitterisdown.com/

Here is another in my list of growing reasons why I think Ubuntu is going bad: net books won't have OpenOffice installed anymore. Instead, documents shall open with Google Docs in the future.

There are of course arguments in favour of this: we are talking about net books, so it seems sensible to make use of "the cloud" to be able to keep the requirements on local resources low. Also, network-based applications open up unprecedent possibilities for collaboration, and Google has unquestionably created some smart products.

However, despite all the hype, I think people are failing to see beyond the initial excitement. I fear that there'll be many instances of "oh had I known better" in the future. And Ubuntu is basically suggesting — even forcing you — to go along (if you have a net book that is). I wonder if they asked their users.

The decision just seems like a horrible move:

I am aware that we're talking about the default Ubuntu installation, and that users who want will still be able to install local applications to replace the network-based ones. However, Ubuntu's market position is, I think, largely a result of making selection decisions for users (who didn't want to choose one of 30 software packages for a task). As such, the decision that was made for the upcoming Ubuntu release is likely going to be accepted unchallenged by most of their users.

I consider this irresponsible, and probably not in the interest of their users. But it's likely that there's a direct financial benefit for Ubuntu (or Canonical) with this move. As I said before, money just doesn't mix well with consumer interests, but money is more exciting for some people.